Official Thimbleweed Park Forums

What's for dinner?

#896

I´d hit eat that!

3 Likes
#897

Sounds disgusting, but looks surprisingly delicious.

1 Like
#898

I’d eat it too, but only with knife and fork.

1 Like
#899

You´re like my dad. He eats everything with knife and fork. Pizza…even chicken wings…

#900
Oh shit...


Well, I don’t really like chicken wings but last time I did use my :raised_hand_with_fingers_splayed:.
But I do eat pizza with knife and fork when at home or in a restaurant.

1 Like
#901

He did that for the photo, you don´t really expect him to be able to handle silverware, do you? :smirk:

Which coincidentally may be one of the reason he likes Hamberders so much.

At the restaurant I have to use knife and fork for cutting. But at home I don´t even do that because I have this neat thing.

Great invention!

Talking about that I could also post that clip from Cobra where Stallone cuts his Pizza with scissors, but I remember posting that previously.

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#902

How do you eat it, with your hands?

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#903

After the photo I’d expect him to hand :fork_and_knife: over to an assistant who then feeds him.

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#904

Ehm, just to say that I’m not ALWAYS preparing and enjoying fancy meals…

Confession time:
plastic lunch today!

3 Likes
#905

Wow, looks like the most delicious piece of plastic I’ve ever seen. Presentation is king! :slight_smile:.
(And eating plastic is probably good for the environment, too.)

3 Likes
#906

Depends if the :poop: is recyclable

4 Likes
#907

To add something constructive for a change, lo and behold: Dak Dori Tang (spicy Korean chicken stew)!


Followed by freshly made, absolutely non-korean lemon cake.


And in case you’re wondering. Here’s a recipe for the stew. Pretty spicy, so beware. (I substituted the rice wine with regular white wine, and left out the sesame leaves).

And for the cake:
200g sugar
350g flour (I use spelt flour)
1pkg vanilla sugar
1pkg baking powder
4 eggs
250g butter
juice of 3 lemons
zest of 2 lemons

Combine everything except for a bit of the lemon juice, whip and pour into a square cake tin. Bake for 45 to 55 minutes at 160°C in a convection oven. Add powdered sugar into the remaining juice and glaze the cake once it’s out of the form, but still warm.

7 Likes
#908

How about another German classic: Rouladen with dumplings and red cabbage.

7 Likes
#909

Asparagus salad, for all those fed up with sauce hollandaise:

image

Peel and cook asparagus as usual, then add Italian dressing, some fresh chives (if available) and a spoonful or two of the cooking water. Cover and let rest for a bit, but serve before it cools too much.

Perfect with grilled meat or boiled potatoes.

3 Likes
#910

Nice! Well done.

The thing that makes me curious are the asparagi themselves: I’ve never seen them so big and so white.

The ones that I’ve always eaten are these ones:

they are tight and dark. We find them on the first mountains of the Appennines during Springtime and eat them without peeling. Perfect for omelettes :slightly_smiling_face:.

#911

They are pretty common (“standard”) in Germany.

1 Like
#912

Same in the Benelux. :slight_smile:

2 Likes
#913

IAnd in northern Italy, too. @Gffp, I’ve seen the ones you posted, but quite seldom.

I’m curious about what an “italian dressing” is supposed to be. EVO, vinegar and salt, I guess.

EDIT: I watched again the white asparagi… actually the ones common in northern Italy are like those, but quite more greenish. Oh, we also have the purple ones, which are white/purple indeed
image

2 Likes
#914

Yes. Also some ground pepper and a variety of herbs in my case.

It’s so typical of foodstuff naming that Italian dressing in unknown in Italy :smile:.

#915

Tonight I made risotto for my wife and a girl friend of hers.

2 Likes