Games & narrative

Not a new topic by any stretch but this is an interesting article on ars technica about the evolution of narrative in games:

TLDR; Gaming is evolving towards reflecting more real-life type situations. The binary choice of wrong/good, popular in the classic adventure games, is becoming rare.

I’m curious what people preference is here. Do you think point & click adventure games should also embrace complex narrative with morally challenging choices?

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Sure, why not? My stance is always: If it can be done, do it! If that manages to suck people even further into the experience that´s a plus on top.

I do enjoy playing morally challenging games. However I find that sometimes I end up not enjoying them (in a relaxing way). I guess introducing non-B&W choices can remove some of the fun for me…

Can you give an example?

I agree with you. But it depends on how the game “presents” the moral. :slight_smile:

This would be my best example of a point & click that I played (and didn’t enjoy):

The Witcher 3 is filled with side-quests with tough choices, however I thoroughly enjoyed this one:

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Hm, I don’t consider it an adventure game. It has a classic point and click look, but it is more like a resource/ time management game. Maybe you don’t find it relaxing because of that.
At least that’s what happened to me. I didn’t complete it.

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I played (and enjoyed) Edna and Harvey. Even if the moral thing happens only at the end.

https://www.gog.com/game/edna_harvey_the_breakout

I like this kind of morally: It’s not too much, it’s funny and I have to think about it/my decision.

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I agree, it’s not your typical point’n’click adventure. Survival mechanics aren’t everyone’s cup of tea.

But in case someone else wants to try it and is also interested in The Red Strings Club:
The game Gods Will Be Watching is included as pre-order bonus.