Official Thimbleweed Park Forums

All about books!


#101

I’ve heard it with movies like “genre films” meaning sci-fi and horror mainly (maybe the term started out with movies…)

Yeah it sucks that they’re usually given short-shrift…
I had a great lecturer at university though who ran a sci-fi literature course (as part of an English degree) and it included stuff like War of the Worlds, Dune, 1984, Neuromancer, Left Hand of Darkness, Brave New World, I Robot… (he is also a sci-fi author himself, Adam Roberts)


#102

Funnily enough I was listening to Jeff Wayne’s version of that this morning. So good.

That was on my course too (English with a minor in North American Lit and Film). Except I ran out of time to read it. I should get round to it one day.


#103

That´s what the people owning the film rights always say. :frowning:


#104

That happened to me a lot, so much to read! I read the first third of a whole bunch of books… in the second and third year we could choose courses (like the sci-fi one), so I chose things like poetry and children’s literature, partly just to lighten the work load.

In the US?


#105

In the UK (sorry for answering for Kate!).


#106

Ah, cool, mine was in the UK too (I couldn’t remember if having a “minor in” another subject was a UK or US thing…)


#107

Yeah, you don’t see it much over here actually.

Tell me about it! I don’t know anyone who read all their books.

I really wanted to do that but couldn’t get on it because it was so popular! Creative Writing helped the load though, and I was glad I got on that one.


#108

Ah, we didn’t have that, that would have been fun (there was an MA in it though).

I remember some people choosing “epic novel” as a course and regretting it pretty heavily…


#109

Haha…


#110

Picked up the book at my book store today. Only read the first story, Seltene Ereignisse, so far, which I liked. (Much, much better than some other print-on-demand books I read, actually. Remember one in particular where the author thanked his mother in the foreword for her editing and spell checking aid, only to find the first mistake in chapter one, page one.)


#111

Reading this at the moment. Might also be something @PiecesOfKate could be interested in if she doesn´t know it already.

Nicely illustrated (b/w pics in a style just like on the cover) and written like an alphetic ordered dictionary that is grouped by topics (people, places, creatures, stories etc.).

Actually looks like one of those old books they always use as research material in movies about monsters and ghosts. :slight_smile:

grafik


#112

I don’t know of it, but it looks good :slight_smile: I like the design of it, too. I had a ‘look inside’ on Amazon – the ‘weird people’ section looks interesting.


#113

Tad’s my favourite writer! I met him in real life once too.


#114

I just learned that James Follett (the brother of Ken Follett) wrote some novels for several (very old) games - Starglider, Starglider II and Tracker. You can still buy the stories on Amazon:


#115

Having read almost the entire thing now I have a few gripes with it. I don´t really care much for authors refering to their personal experiences or opinions using the phrase “this author” a lot. Especially when used in a lexicon. But what was I to expect from an author sticking his name on the book in huge letters as if everyone was supposed to recognize him.

The thing that rubbed me wrong the most though was the heavy focus on biblical stories. I was really hoping for more exotic or at least more varied stuff. The asian and african myths, monsters and strange people are clearly outnumbered by stories from the bible everyone has heard a millon times, and that´s a bit of a shame.


#116

The Bible is one of the most varied collections in existence. :angel:


#117

I did not know Murakami was a LucasArts fan.


#118

Not as long as it´s only about one god.


#119

From the title, I’d expect this to contain the memoirs of Herman Toothrot.


#120

It’s not, so it passes that criterion. :wink: